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Posted on Jan 26, 2014 in ADHD, Allergies, Diet, Digestive Disorders, Dr. Buckley, Genetically Modified Food, Genetics, Vaccines | 0 comments

ADHD: Should your child take speed, or modify their diet?

By Dr. Buckley

Study shows approximately 70% of children diagnosed with ADHD have food sensitivities, and dietary modification reduces ADHD symptoms by 50% in less than 3 months. 

The American Psychiatric Association states in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) that 5% of children have ADHD, and the CDC estimates the following figures:

  • Approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2011.
  • The percentage of children with an ADHD diagnosis continues to increase, from 7.8% in 2003 to 9.5% in 2007 and to 11.0% in 2011.
  • Rates of ADHD diagnosis increased an average of 3% per year from 1997 to 2006  and an average of approximately 5% per year from 2003 to 2011.
  • Boys (13.2%) were more likely than girls (5.6%) to have ever been diagnosed with ADHD.
  • The average age of ADHD diagnosis was 7 years of age, but children reported by their parents as having more severe ADHD were diagnosed earlier.
  • Prevalence of ADHD diagnosis varied substantially by state, from a low of 5.6% in Nevada to a high of 18.7% in Kentucky.

This is obviously a huge problem, and now we have more evidence to show that it is being completely mismanaged by the conventional medical community who continue to prescribe drugs from the amphetamine family to treat it, such as adderal, ritalin, concerta, and vyvanse.  The following study is from 2009, and I have to wonder how many medical doctors prescribing such amphetamines have actually read it?   The take home from the study reveals that after 9 weeks, over 70% of the children reduced their ADHD symptoms by greater than 50%!   See below:

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 12-19

A randomised controlled trial into the effects of food on ADHD

Abstract

The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of a restricted elimination diet in reducing symptoms in an unselected group of children with Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Dietary studies have already shown evidence of efficacy in selected subgroups. Twenty-seven children (mean age 6.2) who all met the DSM-IV criteria for ADHD, were assigned randomly to either an intervention group (15/27) or a waiting-list control group (12/27). Primary endpoint was the clinical response, i.e. a decrease in the symptom scores by 50% or more, at week 9 based on parent and teacher ratings on the abbreviated ten-item Conners Scale and the ADHD-DSM-IV Rating Scale. The intention-to-treat analysis showed that the number of clinical responders in the intervention group was significantly larger than that in the control group [parent ratings 11/15 (73%) versus 0/12 (0%); teacher ratings, 7/10 (70%) versus 0/7 (0%)]. The Number of ADHD criteria on the ADHD Rating Scale showed an effect size of 2.1 (cohen’s d) and a scale reduction of 69.4%. Comorbid symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder also showed a significantly greater decrease in the intervention group than it did in the control group (cohens’s d 1.1, scale reduction 45.3%). A strictly supervised elimination diet may be a valuable instrument in testing young children with ADHD on whether dietary factors may contribute to the manifestation of the disorder and may have a beneficial effect on the children’s behaviour.

Full access to article here

 

 


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